Chapter 7 - Country Living

     Compilation of writings of Ellen G. White on the topic . . .

              c o u n t r y     l i v i n g          

                                            pages  94  to  108                                                                                                     

                                                        t h e     d i v i n e     i d e a l                                                                          


Although everything God had made was in the perfection of beauty, and there seemed nothing wanting upon the earth which God had created to make Adam and Eve happy, yet He manifested His great love to them by planting a garden especially for them. A portion of their time was to be occupied in the happy employment of dressing the garden, and a portion in receiving the visits of angels, listening to their instruction, and in happy meditation. Their labor was not wearisome, but pleasant and invigorating. This beautiful garden was to be their home, their special residence.— Spiritual Gifts, Volume 3, page 34 (1864). { LDE 94.1} 

Original Quotation:    This sinless pair wore no artificial garments. They were clothed with a covering of light and glory, such as the angels wear. While they lived in obedience to God, this circle of light enshrouded them. Although everything God had made was in the perfection of beauty, and there seemed nothing wanting upon the earth which God had created to make Adam and Eve happy, yet he manifested his great love to them by planting a garden especially for them. A portion of their time was to be occupied in the happy employment of dressing the garden, and a portion in receiving the visits of angels, listening to their instruction, and in happy meditation. Their labor was not wearisome, but pleasant and invigorating. This beautiful garden was to be their home, their special residence. { 3SG 34.1 } 


  What were the conditions chosen by the infinite Father for His Son? A secluded home in the Galilean hills; a household sustained by honest, self-respecting labor; a life of simplicity; daily conflict with difficulty and hardship; self-sacrifice, economy, and patient, gladsome service; the hour of study at His mother’s side, with the open scroll of Scripture; the quiet of dawn or twilight in the green valley; the holy ministries of nature; the study of creation and providence; and the soul’s communion with God—these were the conditions and opportunities of the early life of Jesus.— The Ministry of Healing, 365, 366 (1905). { LDE 94.2} 

Original Quotation:    An expensive dwelling, elaborate furnishings, display, luxury, and ease, do not furnish the conditions essential to a happy, useful life. Jesus came to this earth to accomplish the greatest work ever accomplished among men. He came as God’s ambassador, to show us how to live so as to secure life’s best results. What were the conditions chosen by the infinite Father for His Son? A secluded home in the Galilean hills; a household sustained by honest, self-respecting labor; a life of simplicity; daily conflict with difficulty and hardship; self-sacrifice, economy, and patient, gladsome service; the hour of study at His mother’s side, with the open scroll of Scripture; the quiet of dawn or twilight in the green valley; the holy ministries of nature; the study of creation and providence; and the soul’s communion with God—these were the conditions and opportunities of the early life of Jesus.  { MH 365.3} 

 

                      a w a y    f r o m    t h e    c i t i e s                                

 

Get out of the cities as soon as possible and purchase a little piece of land where you can have a garden, where your children can watch the flowers growing and learn from them lessons of simplicity and purity.—Selected Messages 2:356 (1903). { LDE 95.1} 

Original Quotation:    If we place ourselves under objectionable influences, can we expect God to work a miracle to undo the results of our wrong course? — No, indeed. Get out of the cities as soon as possible, and purchase a little piece of land, where you can have a garden, where your children can watch the flowers growing, and learn from them lessons of simplicity and purity.—The General Conference Bulletin, March 30, 1903. { 2SM 356.5} 


Out of the cities, is my message at this time. Be assured that the call is for our people to locate miles away from the large cities. One look at San Francisco as it is today would speak to your intelligent minds, showing you the necessity of getting out of the cities.... { LDE 95.2} 
The Lord calls for His people to locate away from the cities, for in such an hour as ye think not, fire and brimstone will be rained from heaven upon these cities. Proportionate to their sins will be their visitation. When one city is destroyed, let not our people regard this matter as a light affair, and think that they may, if favorable opportunity offers, build themselves homes in that same destroyed city.... { LDE 95.3} 
Let all who would understand the meaning of these things read the eleventh chapter of Revelation. Read every verse, and learn the things that are yet to take place in the cities. Read also the scenes portrayed in the eighteenth chapter of the same book.— MR 1518 (May 10, 1906). { LDE 95.4} 

Original Quotation:    It has been plainly presented to me that the sanitarium which you are planning to establish should be located in the most healthful place you can secure. But my warning is that of the angel that, standing in Melbourne, said in a clear, distinct voice, “Establish not schools or sanitariums in the cities.” In the future, cities will certainly feel the terrible results of earthquakes and fires. Cities will be destroyed by flood and by lightnings. Out of the cities, is my message at this time.—Letter 158, 1906, pp. 1, 2. (To Dr. and Mrs. D. H. Kress, May 10, 1906.) { 7MR 85.3 } 

  But my warning is that of the angel who, standing in Melbourne, said in a clear, distinct voice, Establish not schools or sanitariums in the cities. In the future, cities will certainly feel the terrible results of earthquakes and fires. Cities will be destroyed by flood and by lightnings. Out of the cities, is my message at this time. { 21MR 90.2 } 
Be assured that the call is for our people to locate miles away from the large cities. One look at San Francisco as it is today would speak to your intelligent minds, showing you the necessity of getting out of the cities.
Do not establish institutions in the cities, but seek a rural location. The call is, “Come out from among them, and be ye separate.” The very atmosphere of the city is polluted. Let your schools be established away from the cities, where agricultural and other industries can be carried on. { 21MR 90.3 } 

The Lord calls for His people to locate away from the cities, for in such an hour as ye think not, fire and brimstone will be rained from heaven upon these cities. Proportionate to their sins will be their visitation. When one city is destroyed, let not our people regard this matter as a light affair, and think that they may, if favorable opportunity offers, build themselves homes in that same destroyed city. { 21MR 90.4 } 
Great precautions were taken to make everything in San Francisco secure against earthquakes, floods, and fires, yet today that great city is lying a mass of debris. Where is there one who, seeing this, can fail to reason from cause to effect? { 21MR 90.5 } 

Let all who would understand the meaning of these things read the eleventh chapter of Revelation. Read every verse, and learn the things that are yet to take place in the cities. Read also the scenes portrayed in the eighteenth chapter of the same book. { 21MR 91.4 } 


Fathers and mothers who possess a piece of land and a comfortable home are kings and queens.—The Adventist Home, 141 (1894). { LDE 96.1} 
 

Original Quotation:     Whenever possible, it is the duty of parents to make homes in the country for their children. { AH 141.1}  Fathers and mothers who possess a piece of land and a comfortable home are kings and queens.  { AH 141.2}  Do not consider it a privation when you are called to leave the cities and move out into the country places. Here there await rich blessings for those who will grasp them.  { AH 141.3} 

 

      c i t i e s    t o    b e    w o r k e d    f r o m    o u t p o s t s                     

   As God’s commandment-keeping people we must leave the cities. As did Enoch, we must work in the cities but not dwell in them.— Evangelism, 77, 78 (1899). { LDE 96.2} 

Original Quotation:     As God’s commandment-keeping people, we must leave the cities. As did Enoch, we
must work in the cities but not dwell in them. — Manuscript 85, 1899.  { Evangelism, page 77.5} 

        Conference Call ended here on July 28, 2020           Internet radio audience was 137,142 listeners


  The cities are to be worked from outposts. Said the messenger of God, “Shall not the cities be warned? Yes, not by God’s people living in them but by their visiting them, to warn them of what is coming upon the earth.”— Selected Messages 2:358 (1902). { LDE 96.3} 

Original Quotation:    The cities are to be worked from outposts. Said the messenger of God, “Shall not the cities be warned? Yes; not by God’s people living in them, but by their visiting them, to warn them of what is coming upon the earth.”—Letter 182, 1902. { 2SM 358.2} 


For years I have been given special light that we are not to center our work in the cities. The turmoil and confusion that fill these cities, the conditions brought about by the labor unions and the strikes, would prove a great hindrance to our work.—Testimonies for the Church 7:84 (1902). { LDE 96.4} 

Original Quotation:    For years I have been given special light that we are not to center our work in the cities. The turmoil and confusion that fill these cities, the conditions brought about by the labor unions and the strikes, would prove a great hindrance to our work. Men are seeking to bring those engaged in the different trades under bondage to certain unions. This is not God’s planning, but the planning of a power that we should in no wise acknowledge. God’s word is fulfilling; the wicked are binding themselves up in bundles ready to be burned. { 7T 84.2} 

 

When iniquity abounds in a nation there is always to be heard some voice giving warning and instruction, as the voice of Lot was heard in Sodom. Yet Lot could have preserved his family from many evils had he not made his home in this wicked, polluted city. All that Lot and his family did in Sodom could have been done by them even if they had lived in a place some distance away from the city.—Evangelism, 78 (1903). { LDE 96.5} 

Original Quotation:   When iniquity abounds in a nation, there is always to be heard some voice giving warning and instruction, as the voice of Lot was heard in Sodom. Yet Lot could have preserved his family from many evils had he not made his home in this wicked, polluted city. All that Lot and his family did in Sodom could have been done by them, even if they had lived in a place some distance away from the city. Enoch walked with God, and yet he did not live in the midst of any city polluted with every kind of violence and wickedness, as did Lot in Sodom. — Manuscript 94, 1903. { Evangelism, page 78.1} 


For the present, some will be obliged to labor in Chicago, but these should be preparing working centers in rural districts from which to work the city. The Lord would have His people looking about them and securing humble, inexpensive places as centers for their work. And from time to time larger places will come to their notice, which they will be able to secure at a surprisingly low price.—Evangelism, 402 (1906). { LDE 96.6} 

Original Quotation:   For the present, some will be obliged to labor in Chicago; but these should be preparing working centers in rural districts, from which to work the city. The Lord would have His people looking about them, and securing humble, inexpensive places as centers for their work. And from time to time larger places will come to their notice, which they will be able to secure at a surprisingly low price.— Manuscript 33, 1906. { MM 305.4} and Evangelism, page 402

 

       r i c h    b l e s s i n g s    i n    a    n a t u r a l    e n v i r o n m e n t                 


We say again, “Out of the cities.” Do not consider it a great deprivation that you must go into the hills and mountains, but seek for that retirement where you can be alone with God, to learn His will and way.... { LDE 97.1} 
I urge our people to make it their lifework to seek for spirituality. Christ is at the door. This is why I say to our people, “Do not consider it a privation when you are called to leave the cities and move out into the country places. Here there await rich blessings for those who will grasp them. By beholding the scenes of nature, the works of the Creator, by studying God’s handiwork, imperceptibly you will be changed into the same image.”— Selected Messages 2:355, 356 (1908). { LDE 97.2} 

Original Quotation:    It is Satan’s purpose to attract men and women to the cities, and to gain his object he invents every kind of novelty and amusement, every kind of excitement. And the cities of the earth today are becoming as were the cities before the Flood.... { 2SM 355.4} 
Who will be warned? We say again, “Out of the cities.” Do not consider it a great deprivation, that you must go into the hills and mountains, but seek for that retirement where you can be alone with God, to learn His will and way { 2SM 355.5} 
I urge our people to make it their lifework to seek for spirituality. Christ is at the door. This is why I say to our people, “Do not consider it a privation when you are called to leave the cities and move out into the country places. Here there await rich blessings for those who will grasp them. By beholding the scenes of nature, the works of the Creator, by studying God’s handiwork, imperceptibly you will be changed into the same image.”— Manuscript 85, 1908.  { 2SM 356.1} 

 

 

     c h a r a c t e r    d e v e l o p m e n t    e a s i e r    in   the    country    


Parents flock with their families to the cities because they fancy it easier to obtain a livelihood there than in the country. The children, having nothing to do when not in school, obtain a street education. From evil associates they acquire habits of vice and dissipation.— Testimonies for the Church 5:232 (1882). { LDE 97.3} 

Original Quotation:    Parents flock with their families to the cities because they fancy it easier to obtain a livelihood there than in the country. The children, having nothing to do when not in school, obtain a street education. From evil associates they acquire habits of vice and dissipation. The parents see all this; but it will require a sacrifice to correct their error, and they stay where they are until Satan gains full control of their children. Better sacrifice any and every worldly consideration than to imperil the precious souls committed to your care. They will be assailed by temptations, and should be taught to meet them; but it is your duty to cut off every influence, to break up every habit, to sunder every tie, that keeps you from the most free, open, and hearty committal of yourselves and your family to God. { 5T 232.2} 

 

Send the children to schools located in the city, where every phase of temptation is waiting to attract and demoralize them, and the work of character building is tenfold harder for both parents and children.— Fundamentals of Christian Education, 326 (1894). { LDE 98.1} 

Original Quotation:  He who taught Adam and Eve in Eden how to tend the garden, would instruct men today. There is wisdom for him who holds the plow, and plants and sows the seed. The earth has its concealed treasures, and the Lord would have thousands and tens of thousands working upon the soil who are crowded into the cities to watch for a chance to earn a trifle; in many cases that trifle is not turned into bread, but is put into the till of the publican, to obtain that which destroys the reason of man formed in the image of God. Those who will take their families into the country, place them where they have fewer temptations. The children who are with parents that love and fear God, are in every way much better situated to learn of the Great Teacher, who is the source and fountain of wisdom. They have a much more favorable opportunity to gain a fitness for the kingdom of heaven. Send the children to schools located in the city, where every phase of temptation is waiting to attract and demoralize them, and the work of character building is tenfold harder for both parents and children. { FE 326.1} 

A small book, titled, Country Living was published in 1946  ( it is 32 pages )

There is not one family in a hundred who will be improved physically, mentally, or spiritually, by residing in the city. Faith, hope, love, happiness, can far better be gained in retired places, where there are fields and hills and trees. Take your children away from the sights and sounds of the city, away from the rattle and din of streetcars and teams, and their minds will become more healthy. It will be found easier to bring home to their hearts the truth of the Word of God.—Manuscript 76, 1905. { CL 13.1} 
Send the children to schools located in the city, where every phase of temptation is waiting to attract and demoralize them, and the work of character building is tenfold harder for both parents and children.—Fundamentals of Christian Education, 326 (1894).  { Country Living, page 13.2} 

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The cities are filled with temptation. We should plan our work in such a way as to keep our young people as far as possible from this contamination.—The Adventist Home, 136 (1902). { LDE 98.2} 

Original Quotation:    Hotbeds of Iniquity — The cities are filled with temptation. We should plan our work in such a way as to keep our young people as far as possible from this contamination.  { AH 136.1} 
The children and youth should be carefully guarded. They should be kept away from the hotbeds of iniquity that are to be found in our cities.  { AH 136.2} 

 

It is time for our people to take their families from the cities into more retired localities, else many of the youth, and many also of those older in years, will be ensnared and taken by the enemy.— Testimonies for the Church 8:101 (1904). { LDE 98.3} 

Original Quotation:   We need keen, sanctified perception. This perception is not to be used in criticizing and condemning one another, but discerning the signs of the times. We are to keep our hearts with all diligence, that we may not make shipwreck of faith. Many who were once firm believers in the truth have become careless in regard to their spiritual welfare and are yielding, without the slightest opposition, to Satan’s well-laid plots. It is time for our people to take their families from the cities into more retired localities, else many of the youth, and many also of those older in years, will be ensnared and taken by the enemy. { 8T 101.1} 

 

There is not one family in a hundred who will be improved physically, mentally, or spiritually, by residing in the city. Faith, hope, love, happiness, can far better be gained in retired places, where there are fields and hills and trees. Take your children away from the sights and sounds of the city, away from the rattle and din of streetcars and teams, and their minds will become more healthy. It will be found easier to bring home to their hearts the truth of the Word of God.—  The Adventist Home, 137 (1905). { LDE 98.4} 

Original Quotation:    There is not one family in a hundred who will be improved physically, mentally, or spiritually, by residing in the city. Faith, hope, love, happiness, can far better be gained in retired places, where there are fields and hills and trees. Take your children away from the sights and sounds of the city, away from the rattle and din of streetcars and teams, and their minds will become more healthy. It will be found easier to bring home to their hearts the truth of the Word of God. — Manuscript 76, 1905. { CL 13.1}  {Adventist Home, page 137 }

 

       b e t t e r     p h y s i c a l    h e a l t h    in   r u r a l    environment      


It is not God’s will that His people shall settle in the cities, where there is constant turmoil and confusion. Their children should be spared this, for the whole system is demoralized by the hurry and rush and noise.—Selected Messages 2:357 (1902). { LDE 98.5} 

Original Quotation:   As far as possible, our institutions should be located away from the cities. We must have workers for these institutions, and if they are located in the city, that means that families of our people must settle near them. But it is not God’s will that His people shall settle in the cities, where there is constant turmoil and confusion. Their children should be spared this; for the whole system is demoralized by the hurry and rush and noise. The Lord desires His people to move into the country, where they can settle on the land, and raise their own fruit and vegetables, and where their children can be brought in direct contact with the works of God in nature. Take your families away from the cities is my message. { 2SM 357.4} 



To many of those living in the cities who have not a spot of green grass to set their feet upon, who year after year have looked out upon filthy courts and narrow alleys, brick walls and pavements and skies clouded with dust and smoke—if these could be taken to some farming district, surrounded with the green fields, the woods and hills and brooks, the clear skies and the fresh, pure air of the country, it would seem almost like heaven.—The Ministry of Healing, 191, 192 (1905). { LDE 99.1} 

Same as the Original Quotation:    To many of those living in the cities who have not a spot of green grass to set their feet upon, who year after year have looked out upon filthy courts and narrow alleys, brick walls and pavements, and skies clouded with dust and smoke—if these could be taken to some farming district, surrounded with the green fields, the woods and hills and brooks, the clear skies and the fresh, pure air of the country, it would seem almost like heaven.   { MH 191.1} 


The physical surroundings in the cities are often a peril to health. The constant liability to contact with disease, the prevalence of foul air, impure water, impure food, the crowded, dark, unhealthful dwellings, are some of the many evils to be met. It was not God’s purpose that people should be crowded into cities, huddled together in terraces and tenements.— The Ministry of Healing, 365 (1905). { LDE 99.2} 

Original Quotation:    The physical surroundings in the cities are often a peril to health. The constant liability to contact with disease, the prevalence of foul air, impure water, impure food, the crowded, dark, unhealthful dwellings, are some of the many evils to be met. { MH 365.1} 
It was not God’s purpose that people should be crowded into cities, huddled together in terraces and tenements
. In the beginning He placed our first parents amidst the beautiful sights and sounds He desires us to rejoice in today. The more nearly we come into harmony with God’s original plan, the more favorable will be our position to secure health of body, and mind, and soul. { MH 365.2}

 

                r a i s e     y o u r     p r o v i s i o n s         


The Lord desires His people to move into the country, where they can settle on the land, and raise their own fruit and vegetables, and where their children can be brought in direct contact with the works of God in nature. Take your families away from the cities, is my message.—Selected Messages 2:357, 358 (1902). { LDE 99.3}

Original Quotation:    As far as possible, our institutions should be located away from the cities. We must have workers for these institutions, and if they are located in the city, that means that families of our people must settle near them. But [it is not God’s will that His people shall settle in the cities, where there is constant turmoil and confusion. Their children should be spared this; for the whole system is demoralized by the hurry and rush and noise. see page 98.5 above ]  The Lord desires His people to move into the country, where they can settle on the land, and raise their own fruit and vegetables, and where their children can be brought in direct contact with the works of God in nature. Take your families away from the cities is my message. { 2SM 357.4} 

 

Again and again the Lord has instructed that our people are to take their families away from the cities, into the country, where they can raise their own provisions, for in the future the problem of buying and selling will be a very serious one. We should now begin to heed the instruction given us over and over again: Get out of the cities into rural districts, where the houses are not crowded closely together, and where you will be free from the interference of enemies.—Selected Messages 2:141 (1904). { LDE 99.4} 

Original Quotation:    The time is fast coming when the controlling power of the labor unions will be very oppressive. Again and again the Lord has instructed that our people are to take their families away from the cities, into the country, where they can raise their own provisions; for in the future the problem of buying and selling will be a very serious one. We should now begin to heed the instruction given us over and over again: Get out of the cities into rural districts, where the houses are not crowded closely together, and where you will be free from the interference of enemies.—Letter 5, 1904. { 2SM 141.1} 

 

    Locate    institutions   'just  out  from  the  large  cities'

 

Let men of sound judgment be appointed, not to publish abroad their intentions, but to search for such properties in the rural districts, in easy access to the cities, suitable for small training schools for workers, and where facilities may also be provided for treating the sick and weary souls who know not the truth. Look for such places just out from the large cities, where suitable buildings may be secured, either as a gift from the owners or purchased at a reasonable price by the gifts of our people. Do not erect buildings in the noisy cities.—Evangelism, 77 (1909). { LDE 100.1} 

Same as Original Quotation:    Let men of sound judgment be appointed, not to publish abroad their intentions, but to search for such properties in the rural districts, in easy access to the cities, suitable for small training schools for workers, and where facilities may also be provided for treating the sick and weary souls who know not the truth. Look for such places just out from the large cities, where suitable buildings may be secured, either as a gift from the owners, or purchased at a reasonable price by the gifts of our people. Do not erect buildings in the noisy cities. — Medical Ministry, 308, 309 (1909). { Ev 77.2} 

 

             c o o r a n b o n g,    new  south  wales         

 

Where shall our Australian Bible School be located? ... Should schools be located in the cities or within a few miles from them it would be most difficult to counteract the influence of the former education which students have received in regard to these holidays and the practices connected with them, such as horse racing, betting, and the offering of prizes.... { LDE 100.2} 

We shall find it necessary to establish our schools out of, and away from, the cities, and yet not so far away that they cannot be in touch with them, to do them good, to let light shine amid the moral darkness.—Fundamentals of Christian Education, 310, 313 (1894). { LDE 101.1} 

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Original Quotation:    Our minds have been much exercised day and night in regard to our schools. How shall they be conducted? And what shall be the education and training of the youth? Where shall our Australian Bible School be located? I was awakened this morning at one o’clock with a heavy burden upon my soul. The subject of education has been presented before me in different lines, in varied aspects, by many illustrations, and with direct specification, now upon one point, and again upon another. I feel, indeed, that we have much to learn. We are ignorant in regard to many things. { FE 310.1} 

It is not the correct plan to locate school buildings where the students will have constantly before their eyes the erroneous practices that have molded their education during their lifetime, be it longer or shorter. These holidays, with all their train of evil, result in twentyfold more misery than good. In a large degree the observance of these days is really compulsory. Even persons who have been truly converted find it difficult to break away from these customs and practices. Should schools be located in the cities or within a few miles from them, it would be most difficult to counteract the influence of the former education which students have received in regard to these holidays and the practices connected with them, such as horse racing, betting, and the offering of prizes. The very atmosphere of these cities is full of poisonous malaria. The freedom of individual action is not respected; a man’s time is not regarded as really his own; he is expected to do as others do. Should our school be located in one of these cities, or within a few miles of it, there would be a counterworking influence constantly in active exercise to be met and overcome. The devotion to amusements and the observance of so many holidays, give a large business to the courts, to officers and judges, and increase the poverty and squalor that need no increasing. { FE 312.2} 

All this is a false education. We shall find it necessary to establish our schools out of, and away from, the cities, and yet not so far away that they cannot be in touch with them, to do them good, to let light shine amid the moral darkness. Students need to be placed under the most favorable circumstances to counteract very much of the education they have received. { FE 313.1} 


Everything about the place had impressed me favorably except the fact that we were far from the great thoroughfares of travel, and therefore would not have an opportunity of letting our light shine amid the moral darkness that covers our large cities like the pall of death. This seems the only objection that presents itself to my mind. But then, it would not be advisable to establish our school in any of our large cities.—Manuscript Releases 8:137 (1894). { LDE 101.2} 

Original Quotation:    Night was drawing on, and we were again placed in our position in the boat, and were soon returning from our tour of inspection by the light of the stars. Everything about the place had impressed me favorably, except the fact that we were far from the great thoroughfares of travel, and therefore would not have an opportunity of letting our light shine amid the moral darkness that covers our large cities like the pall of death. This seems [to be] the only objection that presents itself to my mind. But then, it would not be advisable to establish our school in any of our large cities. In the first place we have but little money and could not afford to purchase high-priced land; and in the second place there would be many temptations in such a locality that would be likely to lead the youth to become demoralized, and it is best to be far away from the cities. This is not so far from the city, but that the light can shine forth in clear, bright rays. There are souls perishing everywhere for the truth of God, and the light must shine in the highways and the byways. { 8MR 137.1 } 


I am more than ever convinced that this is the right location for the school.—Manuscript Releases 8:360 (1894). { LDE 101.3} 

Original Quotation:    Having had this matter presented to me at different times, I am more than ever convinced that this is the right location for the school. Since I have been here for a few days and have an opportunity to investigate, I feel more sure than at my first visit that this is the right place. I think any land which I have seen will produce some kind of a crop.—Manuscript 35, 1894, 2-4. (To S. N. Haskell, August 27, 1894.) { 8MR 360.4 } 

 

                      h u n t s v i l l e,     alabama

  Those who have charge of the schoolwork at Graysville  [The property at Graysville, Tennessee, fifty miles north of Chattanooga, consisted of nine acres of land adjacent to a village of about 200 people. The school was moved to its present location at Collegedale in 1916.]  and Huntsville should see what can be done by these institutions to establish such industries, so that our people desiring to leave the cities can obtain modest homes without a large outlay of means, and can also find employment.—Letter 25, 1902. { LDE 101.4} 

Original Quotation:    Those who have charge of the schoolwork at Graysville and Huntsville should see what can be done by these institutions to establish such industries, so that our people desiring to leave the cities can obtain modest homes without a large outlay of means, and can also find employment. { PCO 14.4 } Abridged Sources: Letter 25, 1902} 


It was in the providence of God that the Huntsville School farm was purchased. It is in a good locality. Near it there are large nurseries, and in these nurseries some of the students have worked during the summer to earn money to pay their expense at the Huntsville School.—SpT-B(12) 11 (1904). { LDE 102.1} 
The Huntsville School farm is a most beautiful place, and with its three hundred and more acres of land, should accomplish much in the line of industrial training and the raising of crops.—SpT-B(12x) 13 (1904). { LDE 102.2} 

Original Quotation:    It was in the providence of God that the Huntsville School farm was purchased. It is in a good locality. Near it there are large nurseries, and in these nurseries some of the students have worked during the summer to earn money to pay their expense at the Huntsville School. Those for whom these students have worked give them a high recommendation, saying that they have accomplished more than an equal number of other hands. { SpTB12 11.2 } 

The Huntsville school farm is a most beautiful place, and with its three hundred and more acres of land, should accomplish much in the line of industrial training and the raising of crops. Heavenly angels will be able to read, in the thrift and painstaking effort revealed in the care of the farm, the story of the improvement made by the students themselves in character-building. { SpTB12x 13.4 } 

Recently the question was asked me, “Would it not be well to sell the school land at Huntsville, and buy a smaller place?” Instruction was given me that this farm must not be sold, that the situation possesses many advantages for the carrying forward of a colored school.—Spalding and Magan Collection, 359 (1904). { LDE 102.3} 

Original Quotation:    Recently the question was asked me, “Would it not be well to sell the school land at Huntsville, and buy a smaller place.” Instruction was given me that this farm must not be sold, that the situation possesses many advantages for the carrying forward of a colored school. It would take years to build up in a new place the work that has been done at Huntsville. The Lord’s money was invested in the Huntsville school farm, to provide a place for the education of colored students. The General Conference gave this land to the Southern work, and the Lord has shown me what this school may become, and what those may become who go there for instruction, if His plans are followed. { SpM 359.4 } 

  Additional Notes:      Oakwood  Timeline    ( 1891 to 1915 )
The Early Years: 1891-1915
This chronological outline of key events pertaining to Oakwood covers the 25-year period from 1891 to 1915, the year of Ellen White’s death (July 16, 1915). { PCO vi.1 }   [Book: A Place Called Oakwood, 170 pages]
1891
Ellen White delivers historic address “Our Duty to the Colored People” to the General Conference session in Battle Creek, Michigan, in 1891 in which she urges the church to develop the work in the South. { PCO vi.2 } 

 

        b e r r i e n    s p r i n g s,    michigan             

 

I hear that there is some thought of locating the school at Berrien Springs in the southwest of Michigan. I am much pleased with the description of this place.... In such a place as Berrien Springs the school can be made an object lesson, and I hope that no one will interpose to prevent the carrying forward of this work.— Manuscript Releases 4:407 (July 12, 1901). { LDE 102.4} 

Original Quotation:    I hear that there is some thought of locating the school at Berrien Springs in the southwest of Michigan. I am much pleased with the description of this place.... In such a place as Berrien Springs the school can be made an object lesson, and I hope that no one will interpose to prevent the carrying forward of this work.—Letter 80, 1901, pp. 4, 5. (To the managers of the Review and Herald office, July 12, 1901.) { 4MR 407.4 } 


The good hand of the Lord has been with our people in the selection of a place for the school. This place corresponds to the representations given me as to where the school should be located. It is away from the cities, and there is an abundance of land for agricultural purposes, and room so that houses will not need to be built one close to another. There is plenty of ground where students may be educated in the cultivation of the soil.—The Review and Herald, January 28, 1902. { LDE 102.5} 

Original Quotation:    To the ministers and other friends of the Berrien Springs School: There are times when things do not look as bright and cheerful as we could wish, because difficulties stand in the way of rapid advancement; but we hope, brethren and sisters, that you all will be encouraged to take a deep interest in the establishment of the school at Berrien Springs, and aid it by the sale of “Christ’s Object Lessons,” and in other ways. Let the sale of “Christ’s Object Lessons” be taken hold of interestedly in our large cities and in the smaller settlements. Brethren, wake up! The good hand of the Lord has been with our people in the selection of a place for the school. This place corresponds to the representations given me as to where the school should be located. It is away from the cities, and there is an abundance of land for agricultural purposes, and room so that houses will not need to be built one close to another. There is plenty of ground where students may be educated in the cultivation of the soil. “Ye are God’s husbandry, ye are God’s building.” { RH January 28, 1902, par. 1 }


In moving the college from Battle Creek and establishing it in Berrien Springs, Brethren Magan and Sutherland have acted in harmony with the light that God gave. They have worked hard under great difficulties.... God has been with them. He has approved of their efforts.—Manuscript Releases 4:260, 261 (1904). { LDE 103.1} 

Original Quotation:    In moving the college from Battle Creek and establishing it in Berrien Springs, Brethren Magan and Sutherland have acted in harmony with the light that God gave. They have worked hard under great difficulties.... God has been with them. He has approved of their efforts.—Manuscript 54, 1904, 1. (Remarks made at Berrien Springs, Michigan, May 23, 1904.) { 4MR 260.5 } 

Found .... in another quote. Missing is in BOLD.   In moving the College from Battle Creek and establishing it in Berrien Springs, Brethren Magan and Sutherland have acted in harmony with the light that God gave. They have worked hard under great difficulties. Upon the school there was a heavy burden of debt that they had not created. They labored and toiled and sacrificed in their endeavor to carry out right lines of education. And God has been with them. He has approved of their efforts. { PC 84.2 } 

Conference Call ended here on August 6, 2020              Internet radio audience was 137,605 listeners

 

              s t o n e h a m,    massachusetts            

The Lord in His providence has opened the way for His workers to take an advance step in New England—a field where much special work should be done. The brethren there have been enabled to arrange to change the location of the sanitarium from South Lancaster to Melrose, a place much nearer Boston, and yet far enough removed from the busy city so that the patients may have the most favorable conditions for recovery of health. The transfer of the New England Sanitarium to a place so convenient to the city of Boston is in God’s providence. { LDE 103.2} 
When the Lord sets His hand to prepare the way before us, God forbid that any should stand back, questioning the wisdom of going forward or refusing to give encouragement and help. The removal of the New England Sanitarium from South Lancaster to Melrose has been presented to me as being directed by the Lord.—SpT-B(13) 3 (1902). { LDE 103.3} 

Same as Original Quotation:    The Lord in His providence has opened the way for His workers to take an advance step in New England,—a field where much special work should be done. The brethren there have been enabled to arrange to change the location of the sanitarium from South Lancaster to Melrose, a place much nearer Boston, and yet far enough removed from the busy city so that the patients may have the most favorable conditions for recovery of health. The transfer of the New England Sanitarium to a place so convenient to the city of Boston, is in God’s providence. When the Lord sets His hand to prepare the way before us, God forbid that any should stand back, questioning the wisdom of going forward, or refusing to give encouragement and help. { SpTB13 3.1 } 

The removal of the New England Sanitarium from South Lancaster to Melrose has been presented to me as being directed by the Lord. { SpTB13 3.2 } 

 

           T a k o m a    p a r k,     washington, DC           

  The location that has been secured for our school and sanitarium is all that could be desired. The land resembles representations that have been shown me by the Lord. It is well adapted for the purpose for which it is to be used. There is on it ample room for a school and sanitarium without crowding either institution. The atmosphere is pure and the water is pure. A beautiful stream runs right through our land from north to south. This stream is a treasure more valuable than gold or silver. The building sites are upon fine elevations with excellent drainage. { LDE 104.1} 
One day we took a long drive through various parts of Takoma Park. A large part of the township is a natural forest. The houses are not small and crowded closely together, but are roomy and comfortable. They are surrounded by thrifty, second-growth pines, oaks, maples and other beautiful trees. The owners of these homes are mostly business men, many of them clerks in the government offices in Washington. They go to the city daily, returning in the evening to their quiet homes. { LDE 104.2} 

A good location for the printing office has been chosen, within easy distance of the post office, and a site for a meetinghouse also has been found. It seems as if Takoma Park has been specially prepared for us, and that it has been waiting to be occupied by our institutions and their workers.—The Signs of the Times, June 15, 1904. { LDE 104.3} 

Same as the Original Quotation of paragraphs 4 through 7    

 

The Lord has opened this matter to me decidedly. The publishing work that has been carried on in Battle Creek should for the present be carried on near Washington. If after a time the Lord says, Move away from Washington, we are to move.—The Review and Herald, August 11, 1903. { LDE 105.1} 

Original Quotation:    The Lord has opened this matter to me decidedly. The publishing work that has been carried on in Battle Creek should for the present be carried on near Washington. If after a time the Lord says, Move away from Washington, we are to move. We are pilgrims and strangers in this earth, seeking a better country, even a heavenly. When the Lord tells us to move, we are to obey, however inconvenient and inconsistent such a command may seem to us to be.  { RH August 11, 1903, Art. A, par. 2 }

 

                            m a d i s o n,    tennessee              


I was surprised when, in speaking of the work they wished to do in the South, they spoke of establishing a school in some place a long way from Nashville. From the light given me I knew that this would not be the right thing to do, and I told them so. The work that these brethren [E. A. Sutherland and P. T. Magan] can do, because of the experience gained at Berrien Springs, is to be carried on within easy access of Nashville, for Nashville has not yet been worked as it should be. And it will be a great blessing to the workers in the school to be near enough to Nashville to be able to counsel with the workers there. { LDE 105.2} 
In searching for a place for the school the brethren found a farm of four hundred acres for sale about nine miles from Nashville. The size of the farm, its situation, the distance that it is from Nashville, and the moderate sum for which it could be purchased, seemed to point it out as the very place for the school work. We advised that this place be purchased. I knew that all the land would ultimately be needed.—The Review and Herald, August 18, 1904. { LDE 105.3} 

Original Quotation:    In connection with the work in Nashville, I wish to speak of the school work that Brethren Sutherland and Magan are planning to do. I was surprised when, in speaking of the work they wished to do in the South, they spoke of establishing a school in some place a long way from Nashville. From the light given me, I knew that this would not be the right thing to do, and I told them so. The work that these brethren can do, because of the experience gained at Berrien Springs, is to be carried on within easy access of Nashville; for Nashville has not yet been worked as it should be. And it will be a great blessing to the workers in the school to be near enough to Nashville to be able to counsel with the workers there. { RH August 18, 1904, par. 11 }
In searching for a place for the school, the brethren found a farm of four hundred acres for sale, about nine miles from Nashville. The size of the farm, its situation, the distance that it is from Nashville, and the moderate sum for which it could be purchased seemed to point it out as the very place for the school work. We advised that this place be purchased. I knew that all the land would ultimately be needed.
For the work of the students, and to provide homes for the teachers, such land can be used advantageously. And as our work advances, a portion of this tract may be required for a country sanitarium. { RH August 18, 1904, par. 12 }

 

                    m o u n t a i n    v i e w,    California             

 

Instruction has also been given that the Pacific Press should be moved from Oakland. As the years have passed by the city has grown, and it is now necessary to establish the printing plant in some more rural place, where land can be secured for the homes of the employees. Those who are connected with our offices of publication should not be obliged to live in the crowded cities. They should have opportunity to obtain homes where they will be able to live without requiring high wages.—Fundamentals of Christian Education, 492 (1904). { LDE 105.4} 

Same as the Original Quotation:    Instruction has also been given that the Pacific Press should be moved from Oakland. As the years have passed by, the city has grown and it is now necessary to establish the printing plant in some more rural place, where land can be secured for the homes of the employees. Those who are connected with our offices of publication should not be obliged to live in the crowded cities. They should have opportunity to obtain homes where they will be able to live without requiring high wages. { FE 492.3 } 


Mountain View is a town which has many advantages. It is surrounded by beautiful orchards. The climate is mild and fruit and vegetables of all kinds can be grown. The town is not large, yet it has electric lights, mail carriers, and many other advantages usually seen only in cities.—Letter 141, 1904. { LDE 106.1} 

Same as the Original Quotation:    Mountain View is a town which has many advantages. It is surrounded by beautiful orchards. The climate is mild and fruit and vegetables of all kinds can be grown. The town is not large, yet it has electric lights, mail carriers, and many other advantages usually seen only in cities.—Letter 141, 1904. { LDE 106.1} 


Some have wondered why our office of publication should be moved from Oakland to Mountain View. God has been calling upon His people to leave the cities. The youth who are connected with our institutions should not be exposed to the temptations and the corruption to be found in the large cities. Mountain View has seemed to be a favorable location for the printing office.—Country Living, page 29 (1905). { LDE 106.2} 

Same as the Original Quotation:    Some have wondered why our office of publication should be moved from Oakland to Mountain View. God has been calling upon His people to leave the cities. The youth who are connected with our institutions should not be exposed to the temptations and the corruption to be found in the large cities. Mountain View has seemed to be a favorable location for the printing office.—Manuscript 148, 1905. { CL 29.1} 

 

                   l o m a    l i n d a,    california             

 

We thank the Lord that we have a good sanitarium at Paradise Valley, seven miles from San Diego; a sanitarium at Glendale, eight miles from Los Angeles; and a large and beautiful place at Loma Linda, sixty-two miles east from Los Angeles, and close to Redlands, Riverside, and San Bernardino. The Loma Linda property is one of the most beautiful sanitarium sites I have ever seen.—Loma Linda Messages, 141 (1905). { LDE 106.3} 

Original Quotation:    Elder Simpson has been holding tent-meetings in Los Angeles with good results. Many souls have been converted to the truth. We thank the Lord that we have a good sanitarium at Paradise Valley, seven miles from San Diego; a sanitarium at Glendale, eight miles from Los Angeles; and a large and beautiful place at Loma Linda, sixty-two miles east from Los Angeles, and close to Redlands, Riverside, and San Bernardino. The Loma Linda property is one of the most beautiful sanitarium sites I have ever seen. There has been expended on the place more than one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, and it was purchased by our people for forty thousand. Of the seventy-six acres of land comprised in the property, about one half forms a hill which stands one hundred and twenty-five feet above the valley. On this hill the buildings are situated. { LLM 141.3 } 

Loma Linda is a place that the Lord has especially designated as a center for the training of medical missionaries.—Letter 188, 1907. { LDE 107.1} 

I can't find Original Quotation Letter 188, 1907 - I did find similar quotes:  Loma Linda is a place that has been especially ordained of God to make a good impression upon the minds of many who have not had the light of present truth. Every phase of the work in this place, every movement made, should be so fully in harmony with the sacred character of present truth as to create a deep spiritual impression. { RH July 12, 1906, par. 21 }

  The Lord has instructed me that it would be a mistake for us to plan for the production of a large quantity of health foods at Loma Linda, to be distributed through commercial channels. Loma Linda is a place that has been especially ordained of God to make a good impression upon the minds of many who have not had the light of present truth. Every phase of the work in this place, every movement made, should be so fully in harmony with the sacred character of present truth as to create a deep spiritual impression. { LLM 165.6 } 

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Here there are wonderful advantages for a school. The farm, the orchard, the pasture land, the large buildings, the ample grounds, the beauty—all are a great blessing.—Loma Linda Messages, 310 (1907). { LDE 107.2} 

Original Quotation:    Elder Burden was reading some extracts from letters that I had written about the school work. When he had finished I read the article I had with me, which was right to the point. It spoke of the school that should be operated here at Loma Linda. Here there are wonderful advantages for a school. The farm, the orchard, the pasture land, the large buildings, the ample grounds, the beauty,—all are a great blessing. If all will now take hold intelligently of the work that should be done here, there will be success. { LLM 310.1 } 

This place, Loma Linda, has wonderful advantages, and if those who are here will faithfully avail themselves of the advantages to become true medical missionaries they will let their light shine forth to those that are around them. We must seek God daily for His wisdom to be imparted to us.—Letter 374, 1907. { LDE 107.3} 

Same as the Original Quotation:    

Here we have ideal advantages for a school and for a sanitarium. Here are advantages for the students and great advantages for the patients. I have been instructed that here we should have a school, conducted on the principles of the ancient schools of the prophets.... Physicians are to receive their education here.—Medical Ministry, 75, 76 (1907). { LDE 107.4} 

Original Quotation:   Here we have ideal advantages for a school and for a sanitarium. Here are advantages for the students, and great advantages for the patients. I have been instructed that here we should have a school conducted on the principles of the ancient schools of the prophets. It may not be carried on in every respect as are the schools of the world, but it is to be especially adapted for those who desire to devote their lives, not to commercial pursuits, but to unselfish service for the Master. { MM 75.3} 
We want a school of the highest order—a school where the word of God will be regarded as essential and where obedience to its teachings will be taught. For the carrying forward of such a school, we must have carefully selected educators. Our young people are not to be wholly dependent on the schools where they are told, “If you wish to complete your course of instruction, you must take this study, or some other study”—studies that perhaps would be of no practical benefit to those whose only desire is to give to the world God’s message of health and peace. In the education that many receive, there are not only subjects that are nonessential, but much that is decidedly objectionable. We should endeavor to give instruction that will prepare students quickly for service to their fellowmen. { MM 75.4} 
We are to seek for students who will plow deep into the word of God, and who will conform the life practice to the truths of the word. Let the education given be such as will qualify consecrated young men and young women to go forth in harmony with the great commission.... { MM 76.1} 
Physicians are to receive their education here. Here they are to receive such a mold that when they go out to labor, they will not seek to grasp the very highest wages or else do nothing.—Talk given by E. G. W., Oct. 30, 1907. Manuscript 151, 1907. { MM 76.2} 

 

                         a n g w i n,    california                

 

As I have looked over this property I pronounce it to be superior in many respects. The school could not be located in a better spot. It is eight miles from St. Helena, and is free from city temptations.... { LDE 107.5} 
In time, more cottages will have to be built for the students, and these the students themselves can erect under the instruction of capable teachers. Timber can be prepared right on the ground for this work, and the students can be taught how to build in a creditable manner. { LDE 108.1} 
We need have no fear of drinking impure water for here it is supplied freely to us from the Lord’s treasure house. I do not know how to be grateful enough for these many advantages.... { LDE 108.2} 
We realize that the Lord knew what we needed and that it is His providence that brought us here.... God wanted us here and He has placed us here. I was sure of this as I came on these grounds.... I believe that as you walk through these grounds you will come to the same decision—that the Lord designed this place for us.—Manuscript Releases 1:340, 341, 343 (1909). { LDE 108.3} 

Original Quotation:      When we learned that we were not going to be able to secure the Sonoma property, an assurance was given to me that a better place was provided for us, where we could have many advantages over our first selection. As I have looked over this property, I pronounce it to be superior in many respects. The school could not be located in a better spot. It is eight miles from St. Helena, and is free from city temptations. The entire cost is sixty thousand dollars ($60,000.00). $40,000.00 of this money has been raised, and we hope the balance will soon be forthcoming. Our people see that this property is much better than we hoped to be favored with. It is situated only six miles from the Sanitarium where Dr. Rand is head physician. The leading workers of these two institutions can cooperate in their work to carry forward the work of sanitarium and school solidly. { 1MR 340.3 } 

In time, more cottages will have to be built for the students, and these the students themselves can erect under the instruction of capable teachers. Timber can be prepared right on the ground for this work, and the students can be taught how to build in a creditable manner. { 1MR 341.2 } 

We need have no fear of drinking impure water, for here it is supplied freely to us from the Lord’s treasure house. I do not know how to be grateful enough for these many advantages, but I feel like putting my whole trust in the Lord, and as long as my life is spared to glorify my Redeemer. With heart and soul and voice I praise Him that He has made such wonderful provision for us. { 1MR 341.3 } 

We are very grateful to the Lord of hosts for this possession; for we have here just what we hoped to have in the Buena Vista estate,—place where we can study the works of nature, and in the woods and mountains around us, learn of God through His works. And here, by the study of His handiwork, we can learn how to present God to others. I thank God with heart and soul and voice for the abundant advantages we have. We realize that the Lord knew what we needed, and that it is His providence that brought us here. Our disappointment in regard to the Buena Vista estate was great; and it was hard to know that all our expectations concerning it must be given up; but we thank the Lord that the matter has worked out to the glory of God. Let us be thankful, and let us give expression to our thankfulness. { 1MR 343.1 } 
God wanted us here, and He has placed us here. I was sure of this as I came on these grounds. The advantages I see in the cultivated soil go far beyond my expectations. And I am thankful that so many are here today to see these things for themselves. I believe that as you walk through these grounds, you will come to the same decision,—that the Lord designed this place for us, and that it has been the work of His providence that has brought it into our possession. { 1MR 343.2 } 

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               End  of  Chapter

   Additional reading:  A small book, titled, Country Living was published in 1946  ( it is 32 pages )

           Phrase:   Leave the cities

                     

                                      Continue  to  Chapter  8    The Cities

                                      Return  to  Chapter  6 --  Lifestyle of the Remnant  

                                      Return  to  Table of Contents  page

 

     

Related Information

Book - Last Day Events Chapter 1 - Earths Last Crisis Chapter 2 - Signs of Christs Return Chapter 3 - When shall these things Be Chapter 4 - God's Last Day Church Chapter 5 - Devotional Life Chapter 6 - Lifestyle of Remnant Chapter 8 - The Cities Chapter 9 - Sunday Laws